Mom’s Pumpkin Bread (gluten & grain free)

April 28, 2017
Mom's Pumpkin Bread

When I was a little girl, one of my favorite things was pumpkin bread – I would look forward to the fall when my mom would make her famous recipe – it was so moist and delicious.  I still love pumpkin bread – but I don’t eat wheat or gluten any more – so I can’t make my mom’s recipe exactly.

But I di use her recipe for inspiration!  This recipe is based on the pumpkin bread that my mom used to make me when I was a kid – except this one is gluten and grain free.  Instead of regular flour, this pumpkin bread is made with cassava flour – which is a root vegetable that is also known as a yuca root. Cassava is both grain and gluten free!!  Learn more about cassava flour.

Although it does have organic sugar, this recipe has quite a bit less sugar than my mom’s original recipe (and most other pumpkin bread recipes) – and you could probably even reduce the sugar content by swapping some 1/2 cup of the sugar for 2 Tablespoons of stevia (I might try it next time).

This recipe even passed the kid test –  my kids loved it and gobbled it up (and they are not always big fans of gluten or grain free recipes)!!

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup unsalted organic butter (1 stick), softened
  • 1/3 cup avocado or coconut oil
  • 1 and 1/2 cup organic cane sugar  (or you could swap out 1/2 cup of the sugar for 1 Tablespoon of organic stevia – so use 1 cup of sugar and 1 Tablespoon of powdered stevia – I like the brand Pyure)
  • 3 eggsOtto's Cassava Flour
  • 1 can of pumpkin puree
  • 2 cups cassava flour
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (I use Real Salt brand)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon gound nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Grease 3 mini bread mold tins.
  3. Sift together the dry ingredients, set aside.
  4. Cream together butter, oil and sugars – mix until creamy.
  5. Then add eggs one at a time, mixing well until it is creamy and a light yellow.
  6. Mix in pumpkin puree & vanilla.
  7. Add in dry ingredients to wet (about 1 cup at a time) – mixing gently.
  8. Pour into greased mini bread molds.
  9. Put into the preheated 325 degree oven for about 50 minutes – or until a toothpick comes out clean. If using regular size bread molds, cook longer – about 60 mins.

Prefer banana bread?  You can substitute 3 ripe bananas for the pumpkin in this recipe to make banana bread! 

Articles:

Cassava Flour: The Best Grain-Free Baking Alternative?

Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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15 Tips for Fixing Constipation (Without Miralax!)

March 29, 2017
15 Tips for Fixing Constipation

Occasional mild constipation can happen to anyone – often it is due to a stressful event, interruptions to your routine, or diet (maybe you were traveling, or you just went a little crazy with the cheese plate).  But generally, as long as you get back to you normal routine or diet, or the stress subsides – the constipation will resolve and you will be feeling normal in a day or so.  If you have ever had occasional constipation, you know the feeling – discomfort, bloating, feeling full, gassy and sluggish.  Now imagine what it would be like to feel that way most of the time. Chronic constipation is hte #1 cause of kids’ belly pain, and a common reason to miss school and activities. In addition – being constipated can impede the body’s ability to detoxify. When constipation is ongoing or chronic, it generally is a signal that something is amiss somewhere in the digestion and elimination process – with the organs, the nerves, and anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract.

In some cases, constipation can become a medical emergency. According to this article by Dr. Mercola – Constipation Emergencies are on the Rise, “there was a 42 percent increase in ER visits for constipation in the US between 2006 and 2011.” If chronic constipation goes on for a long time, it could leads to a blockage, also known as fecal impaction.

What is constipation? Look before you flush!

Not everyone agrees on the definition of constipation – some experts say as long as you “go” 3 times a week, you are fine. But most natural & holistic health practitioners say anything less than 1 daily movement is constipation. You should look before you flush, because another way to identify constipation is by the quality of the stool – even if you are passing stool – if they are hard, little pebbles – it is considered constipation.  (see below Bristol stool chart).  Another consideration is when you are not completely emtpying the bowel – incomplete evacuations are another sign of constipation.  Also – if someone has to strain every time they go in order to pass the stool – this is another sign of constipation.  The ideal situation is to have at least one complete evacuation of the bowel daily with a type 3 or 4 bowel movement on the Bristol Stool chart – which is a smooth and easy to pass stool.  Some people may pass more than 1 daily.

Screen Shot 2017-03-27 at 11.36.11 AM

Underlying Causes of Constipation:

Chronic constipation can be caused by a long list of issues including:

  • picky eating
  • highly processed diets
  • undiagnosed food sensitivities (dairy tends to be a common culprit)
  • being sedentary, lack of exercise
  • low fiber consumption (or oddly enough, in some cases too much fiber consumption)
  • insufficient fluid intake, chronic dehydration
  • behavioral issues (like “withholding” or ignoring the urge to go)
  • changes in routine or diet (like travel, or overindulging in a constipating food like cheese)
  • developmental issues
  • nerve damage or nerve disorders
  • gut dysbiosis (overgrowth of yeast or bacteria in the GI tract)
  • viral, bacterial, or parasitic infection in the gut
  • congestion in the liver, kidneys, or intestines
  • certain supplements can be constipating like calcium and iron.
  • Medications (some medications like opiods and antacids can cause constipation)
  • medical conditions (like thyroid disease, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Hirschsprung’s disease, neurological disorders, untreated B12 deficiency, brain injury)
  • poorly managed stress
  • disease – if constipation is not resolved with diet and supplement changes, you should see a health practitioner to rule out more serious causes like colon cancer.

Miralax Concerns:

For constipation sufferers – the tasteless and odorless over the counter medication Miralax seemed to offer an easy solution to the problem – just stir it into a glass of water or juice, and drink it down – problem solved, right?  Not so fast…although doctors have been recommending it as a safe solution for constipation in kids for years, prescribing Miralax is not FDA approved for use in children, so giving it to kids is an “off-label” use. And giving it to anyone for longer than a week is also off label.  Miralax’s label – says that it is for use in people age 17 and over, and not for more than 7 days (without a doctor’s orders).

The research on the long-term safety of propylene glycol (PEG) use in kids is limited at best.  And there have been concerns regarding the safty of Miralax’s use in children for several years.  According to the NY Times, “the Empire State Consumer Project, a New York consumer group, sent a citizen petition to the F.D.A. on behalf of parents concerned about the increase in so-called adverse events related to PEG that health professionals and consumers have reported to the F.D.A. over the past decade.”  According to this NY Times article, tests conducted by the F.D.A. in 2008 on eight batches of Miralax,  found tiny amounts of ethylene glycol (EG) and diethylene glycol (DEG) in all of the samples – which are ingredients in antifreeze. Despite being conducted in 2008, the results of the tests were not disclosed to the public.  The article also said that taking Miralax for long periods of time could lead to developing “acidic blood.”

Since the start of 2017, a growing number of parents have come forward complaining of a myriad of psychological, behavorial, and neurological symptoms that they have been linked to the active ingredient propylene glycol (PEG) found in Miralax and some other laxatives – these side effect include tics, stuttering, anger/aggression, depression, anxiety, memory issues, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and more.  There is a Facebook group called Parents Against Miralax that has grown from about 2,000 to over 18,000 members in just a few weeks time.

Many doctors are still recommending it as a safe option, while others are questioning the safety.  “Every pediatric GI physician, I would guarantee you, has told a family this is a safe product,” said Dr. Kent C. Williams, a gastroenterologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Now, he worries, “it may not be true.” According to the NY Times, “Scrutiny for Laxatives as a Childhood Remedy.”

Many kids and families have been using Miralax without being told of the potential risks, and having never been offered any natural alternatives to try first. Now with the possible side effect concerns – a lot of parents are scrambling to find a safe & natural alternative to Miralax – that works.

The good news is there are lots of natural alternatives that are safe, effective, and offer lots of positive health benefits.

15 Tips for Fixing Constipation Naturally:

Note:  Do not expect constipation to resolve overnight – take your time and implement changes very slowly and gradually to allow the body to adjust.  Any major changes made to the diet or with supplements are best done on the weekend when the child is not rushing out of the house, and can be near a toilet in case they happen to get loose stools, and home relaxing in case there is any discomfort, gas, or bloating.  Kids under the age of 4, or with a medical conditions (such as kidney disease), or currently taking medications – should speak to their pediatrician or specialist before implementing any of the below suggestion.   The content of this article is not to be construed as medical advice. – all information provided in this article is general and not specific to individuals. Contact your doctor or specialist with any questions about how this information pertains to you, your child.

1. Boost Hydration

Studies show that most kids are not replenishing enough fluids each day, making them chronically dehydrated. Without proper hydration, the stools can become hard and difficult to pass (Type 1 and 2 on the Bristol chart). Overtime this situation can become chronic constipation.  Just correcting hydration alone can potentially solve the constipation problem for certain kids!

  • Make sure kids are bringing water bottles to school, and that they are not coming back home full!
  • They should drink plenty of water and fluids spread out throughout the day. Try to not drink too much water with meals, it can dilute the digestive enzymes and work against digestion.
  • Avoiding sugary beverages is smart, as they can quickly lead to weight gain, cavities, and candida overgrowth (which can contribute to constipation).  If you do choose juice – drink only unsweetened juice and dilute it with half water.  Good juices for constipation are prune, pear, and freshly squeezed lemon.
  • Diets rich in plant-based foods are also very hydrating, and come paired with natural vitamins, minerals and fiber. Foods like melons, cucumbers, romaine lettuce, celery, and tomatoes, all contain a lot of water – which helps to lubricate and boost digestion.
  • Consider adding mineral drops and a small pinch of high quality Real Salt to 1-2 of your servings of water daily – this helps to boosts the magnesium, potassium, and trace mineral levels.  Optimal minerals are very important for preventing constipation.

2. Identify & Remove Constipating Foods / Food Sensitivities:

When constipation is chronic, going on an allergy elimination diet is a very good idea. Undiagnosed food allergies or sensitivities can cause inflammation, digestive troubles, problems absorbing nutrients, and constipation. It is also important to discover a food sensitivity because they can lead to damage in the small intestine, and many other very serious health issues overtime. I generally recommend keeping a food journal for a few days before starting the elimination diet, during the elimination period, and after.  Download this Food Mood Journal for free.

Almost any intolerance to a food could cause constipation, two of the most common culprits are dairy and gluten:

  • Dairy – one of the most constipating foods can be cows milk products. Only about 40% of the population has the ability to properly digest dairy, that means for the majority of the population (60%), dairy will interfere with digestion. For some, it can cause loose stools, while in others it can cause constipation.  Cheese can be especially constipating. Removing dairy from the diet for a couple weeks can help to determine if that is the root of the problem. Substitute a non-dairy milk, and non-dairy cheese and see if the condition improves.  After about 3 weeks of avoiding the food, you can reintroduce some dairy to “challenge” it.  If there are symptoms (constipation, sneezing, etc) – continue to avoid for 2-3 more months.  Try the challenge again.  If there is a reaction – continue to avoid.  If there is no reaction – then you may begin to incorporate small amounts of dairy, but remove it again if there are issues.
  • Gluten – Most people think that people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance will suffer from diarrhea, which many do. But celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity can also lead to constipation. Some patients with celiac disease are mistakenly diagnosed initially with irritable bowel syndrome, which has similar symptoms.

Test – Don’t want to do an elimation diet, or would rather just test?  A food intolerance panel can be run to identify food intolerances as well – such as the ALCAT test.

Cutting back on sugary and processed or “enriched” foods will not only benefit digestion – but it will benefit weight, energy, and overall health too. Processed foods lack enzymes, fiber and nutrients. Diets that are highly processed and sugary not only can lead to constipation, but can also lead to inflammation in the gut and an overgrowth of candida, which is a yeast.  Also – the more sweet foods a child eats, the less they will enjoy unsweetened foods like vegetables, so getting rid of the sugar for a little while helps to reset the taste buds and metabolism. High sugar consumption also raises our triglycerides, blood sugar, and increases our risk of many diseases.  Read: 20 Reasons to Break up with Sugar to learn more.

3. Eat more constipation-relieving foods

Increasing foods that are naturally rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals like fruits and vegetables will help to get the digestion moving better.  Some particularly good foods for constipation include: prunes and other dried fruits, pears, kiwis, blueberries, cooked beets, cooked sweet potatoes, cooked oatmeal, and (well hydrated) chia seeds.

4. Exercise

If you want to get “things” moving – get moving!!  Exercise is really important for overall health and digestion.  Kids have more reasons than ever to be sedentary – lots of screentime, homework, etc.  Kids who are not out being active can suffer from sluggish digestion. In addition to promoting regularity, exercise also benefits our mood, weight, energy, and sleep.  So turn off the screens and get moving!

5. Get Healthy Fats

Healthy fats help to lubricate the colon and keep things moving.  My favorite fat for constipation is coconut oil.  It is antiviral, antibacterial – so it will help to improve the bacterial balance in the colon, and it also does not require bile salts for digstion – so those with a sluggish gallbladder will still be able to digest it well. It is also metabolism-boosting and easily converted into energy.  Any adult that has tried a Bulletproof coffee (which has 1-2 Tablespoons of coconut oil, plus 1-2 Tablespoons of grass fed butter in it) can attest to the fact that eating a lot of coconut oil and butter can make you “go!”   Other healthy fats that benefit digestion and metabolism include grass fed butter, flax oil (not for cooking), olive oil, and avocado oil.

Some ways to get coconut oil into the diet are – adding it to smoothies, stir into oatmeal, cook with it, and making these “coconut oil chocolates”:

  • Coconut oil chocolates:  just melt 1/3 cup dark chocolate chips with 1/4 cup coconut oil (optional – add 2-4 drops of peppermint essential oil) – stir together all ingredients and then pour into the silicon ice cube tray – and put in freezer.  Store in freezer so they do not melt.  This makes 1 batch of mini chocolates – I used the square one of these silicon ice cube tray molds.  If using a larger mold like this heart shaped one, then double the recipe.

6. Time.

It is important to make sure your child has enough time each morning to sit and relax on the potty before going off to school. Even if you have to wake them up earlier in the morning – make sure they have plenty of time after breakfast to sit on the potty. Morning is one of the most optimal times to have a bowel movement. Sometimes kids will “hold it” at school, traveling, or if they are out in public. Some teachers might restrict bathroom breaks, to limit disruptions to the school day. If your child suffers from urinary tract, constipation or digestive troubles; make sure to inform the teacher so he knows to not to restrict your child’s access to the bathroom. If the teacher does not agree, bring your issue to the principal, there is a disabilities act that prevents kids who have continence issues from being restricted from using the bathroom.

7. Squat.

The modern toilet is not designed to put our bodies into the ideal position for moving our bowels.  Raising the feet up onto a stool or a Squatty Potty can be very helpful in getting the anatomy in the right position to make a bowel movement.  Especially little kids whose feet don’t even reach the ground – they need a little support.  The Squatty Potty comes in two sizes, to fit the individual just right and get them into the right squatting position for optimal bowel movements.  It also stores neatly under the toilet when not in use.  If you don’t want to invest in a Squatty Potty – you could stack up some books, or use a little step stool – but once you do – you will see how great it is to get in the right position and you will want the Squatty Potty – because it can be washed clean, and fits perfectly next to the potty. As they say “try the stool for your stools!”

8. Boost magnesium

Too much calcium and not enough magnesium can lead to constipation (it also has been linked to increased risk of heart attack, due to calcifications of the arteries). As many as 70% of Americans are deficient in magnesium. This can result in constipation, headaches, sore muscles, nerve troubles, restless legs, nervousness, and even increased fractures. Taking magnesium before bedtime is helpful with constipation. For some kids, taking magnesium before school is also helpful – as magnesium is called “the calming mineral’ – so it can help them to be calm in school.

Seek out foods that are rich in magnesium – like dark leafy greens, nuts, and seeds. If you are craving chocolate, it could be your body telling you that you need magnesium, because cacao (the main ingredient in chocolate) is one of the highest known food sources for magnesium. Most people also will benefit from taking a magnesium supplements, such as Natural Calm (for ages 4 and up). Magnesium can also be absorbed via the skin by soaking in an epsom or Dead Sea salt bath – I particularly like this brand Dead Sea Warehouse‘s salt bath product – it is very high quality and affordable. Another option is using magnesium oils – which can be applied topically.

9. Get some C!

If your bowels are feeling sluggish, vitamin C supplements can be a wonderful way to get the bowels moving. Chewing one or two of these vitamin C gummies on an empty stomach in the morning, might just be what is needed to produce a bowel movement (BM). – they are 125 mg each.  For older kids, you might want to find a capsule, powder, or liquid vitamin C with 500 mg./serving.  Vitamin C (like magnesium) can be taken to bowel tolerance* (the amount needed to produce a BM).   If the stool is loose*, just take less vitamin C.  If the vitamin C bothers the tummy – look for a buffered brand, or take with food (it will have less of an effect of moving the bowels however if taken with food).  If tummy upset occurs from taking vitamin C, 1 glass of water with a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda mixed in might help reduce the acidity of the vitamin C.  Learn more here: vitamin c for constipation.

* Taking too much magnesium or vitamin C can lead to diarrhea, so you want to gradually increase it over several days.  If diarhea does occur – make sure to give your child an electrolyte replenisher and fluids – I like Scratch Labs electrolyte replenisher packets, or Nuun tablets.  Make sure to back off and take less magnesium and vitamin C if this does occur.

10. Increase Fiber – gradually please!! 

Most Americans do not get nearly the amount of fiber they need each day. There are 2 types of fiber – soluble and insoluble. Soluble dissolves in water, creating a gel. Insoluble fiber passes through undigested, so it adds bulk.  Adding too much fiber to the diet too quickly is not a good idea – it can cause discomfort, and can even make the constipation worse, especially if fluids are not increased along with the added fiber.  So make sure to drink extra liquids as well when increasing dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber because it needs to soak up water in order to work.  Adding in too much fiber, too fast, without enough fluids could not only cause discomfort, gas and bloating – it could even potentially cause a blockage – especially if there are already hard stools stuck in the colon.  If a stool has not been produced within the past day, before adding in fiber to the diet – consider using an enema or suppository to make sure the colon is clean first – this will make a blockage less likely to develop from the added fiber.  And remember to add the fiber in gradually.

Ideally before adding in any bulking fibers (insoluble fiber)… the bowels should have moved and be fairly cleaned out.  If all of the above steps have been implemented and the bowels have not been moved.  It is a good idea to do a thorough bowel “clean out.”  Often, doctors will prescribe Miralax for this.  But there are many other ways to achieve a clean out without Miralax.  A glycerin or liquid pediatric suppository or an enema may be used at this point.  If a suppository or enema is chosen, it is important for everyone to remain calm and not to appear embarrassed – the child often will mirror our behavior and attitude, and if they are tense – it can make it more uncomfortable. Using a little coconut oil as lubrication can make it significantly more comfortable.  (Read: How to give a child an enema in 5 Steps).

Approximately how much fiber should my child get each day? It can vary from person to person – but a general guideline for kids ages 3-18 is to add the number 5 to your child’s age, and in general, that is the number of grams of fiber they need daily – so an average 11 year old, should have about 16 grams of fiber per day. A 6 year old needs about 11 grams. Recommednations for an average adult are to get about 25 grams each day.  But again – this can very from person to person.  Through experiementation – find what works for you and your child – and try to have a balance of soluble and insoluble fibers.

Some good fiber sources:

  • Chia seeds – can be a miracle food for constipation. Chia seeds work very much like Miralax does – by drawing in water. Yet unlike Miralax, Chia is a superfood, and highly nutritious. Not only is chia a gentle and very effective fiber – it is also an excellent source of omega 3s and protein, minerals, and antioxidants. One of the most hydrophillic foods, chia seeds soak up about 15 times it’s own weight in water, which boosts hydration and provides lasting energy. Always make sure to take chia seeds with plenty of water or fluids, or they can draw water from within the body, which can be dehydrating.
  • Flax seeds are another good source of nutritious fiber – and ground flax is a great replacement for flour. Try these delicious muffins made with ground flax (totally flourless) – click on the link below to get the recipe:
  • Oatmeal – a good source of soluble fiber, which in addition to helping prevent constipation, helps lower cholesterol.
  • Fruits & veggies – So many common diseases and health problems could be helped simply by increasing our plant-based foods. Eating more whole fresh fruits and veggies will provide both fiber and enzymes – which boost digestion. More plant-based foods also lower your risk of most diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Although fruit is a nice alternative to a sweet dessert, preferably you want to eat fruit a half hour before, or two hours after a meal. The reason is that fruit is digested more quickly than proteins, complex carbs and fats, and so if you eat fruit right after a meal, it will want to pass through the system faster than the other foods, and ferment on top of them – creating reflux and other issues. If you think you can’t tolerate fruit, try eating it on an empty stomach and see if you are able to tolerate it better.
  • Fiber supplements – adding in a fiber supplement can be very useful.  I like Regular Girl, which is a prebiotic soluble fiber which is paired with probiotics, or Sunfiber – which does not contain the probiotics.  Both Regular Girl and Sunfiber are colorless and flavorless, just like Miralax. Some kids might prefer a fiber gummy.  Another good product is called Vibrant Flora Improved Bowel Support from Vibrant Health – which contains prebiotic fiber, probiotics, and a number of herbs and other nutrients to help condition and heal the digestive tract. It is not colorless and flavorless – but it has a nice orange flavor and dissolves well, so it is not gritty.   Note: Please follow the directions on the packaging of supplements, contact the manufacturer with questions. 

11. Balance the Gut Bacteria.

We need to balance out the bacteria in our gut – probiotics boosts the good bacteria, which is very important for healthy digestion, a balanced weight, and a strong immune system. Fermented and cultured foods and drinks such as kefir and yogurts can provide natural probiotics, or you can add a probiotic supplement to the daily routine.  Prebiotics are also helpful – because they are food for the probiotics.  Prebiotics are founnd in certain fibrous foods, and supplements.

There are instances when taking probiotics or prebiotics may not be a good idea – at least initially.  If someone has Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), that means that there is bacteria growing in the small intestine, this can lead to bloating and distention when carbohydrates are eaten.  If you suspect that your child may have SIBO ( gas, bloating after eating carbs), then you might want to seek out a SIBO specialist to have them evaluated and treated – they may or may not think probiotics are a good idea.  Once the SIBO is resolved, probiotics may or may not be appropriate for repopulating the gut to prevent further dysbiosis.  Some of the supplements mentioned above have probiotics and prebiotics

Read The Importance of Good Bacteria to learn more.

12. Boost HcL and Enzymes!

The body naturally produces hydrochloric acid (HcL) and enzymes to digest foods, which are needed to break food down for absorption and digestion. If we are low on stomach acid or enzymes, food may not get properly broken down for digestion, so it will be harder to pass through the digestive tract, and also the body will absorb less of the nutrients. If you suffer from acid reflux, you might think that you need to reduce the acid in your stomach. But usually, it means you do not have enough acid or enzymes.

  • Raw fruits & vegetables contain natural enzymes, especially foods like papaya, pineapple.
  • Have a digestive tonic before meals – mix the juice from 1/4 of a fresh lemon and 1/2 tsp. of raw apple cider vinegar to 8 oz. of water. Add a 1/2 tsp. of honey or an 1/8 tsp of stevia to sweeten if you like.
  • Digestive Enzymes – are also available in supplement forms, and can help kids with digestive troubles, especially reflux.
  • High quality salt (sodium chloride) is very important for production of HcL. So I always recommend getting rid of the table salt, and replacing it with a mineral-rich Real Salt brand, pink Himalayan salt, or Celtic sea salt because it is broken down into hydrocholic acid, whereas table salt is not.

13. Stimulate the vagus nerve

Constipation can stem from issues with motility.  When the migrating motor complex or the vagus nerve re not working optimally – this can lead to slow motility.  If that is the case, stimulating the vagus nerve can help to get things Nervanamoving again.  Singing, vigorous gargling, gagging, and deep breathing can stimulate the vagus nerve.  Or you can use a device called Nervana – which stimualtes the vagus nerve through the ear.  In addition to improving motility, stimulating the vagus nerve can help with reducing stress and anxiety, and promoting a calm feeling and good sleep.

14. Smoothies!

One of my favorite ways to sneak lots of good nutrition, fiber and hydration into a glass are smoothies. Especially good for picky eaters – smoothies are a great way to sneak in healthy ingredients!

Orange Dream Smoothie:

Makes one 8 oz. smoothie

  • 1/2 cup of water, or coconut water
  • 1/4 cup non dairy milk
  • 1 small orange (peel removed)
  • 1/2 scoop dairy free protein powder (I like Warrior Blend vanilla)
  • 1/2 cup frozen mangos or peaches
  • 1/2 Tablespoon white chia seeds
  • 2-3 baby carrots
  • Optional – you could add a probiotic powder for additional beneficial bacteria
  • Directions:  Put the liquid in the blender and add the chia seeds, let soak for a few minutes to soften. Then add the rest of the ingredients, blend well, and serve this delicious & nutritious smoothie that tastes like an orange creamsicle!

15.  Essential oils

Essential oils can be very helpful for dealing with the discomfort of constipation and helping resolve digestion issues.  I like a product called Digest Zen from DoTerra.  Peppermint essential oil is also very helpful when there is bloating or discomfort.  But please be aware that essential oils are very powerful – even one drop is powerful – so always be sure to keep them out of young children’s reach. When using topically, always use a carrier oil (coconut works wonderfully). You can put a tablespoon of coconut oil into a little container – and add a few drops of essential oil like Dgest Zen – and then rub that on the belly as needed. You could also order or make your own DigestZen rollerball that has the carrier oil in it.   Another topical remedy to consider is castor oil.  Just rub a little castor oil on the right side of the abdomen (this is the liver area) before bedtime.

When to Seek Medical Attention:

Realize that digestion issues may take a while to resolve, and it might be a good idea to slowly ease into the changes. If the constipation and digestion issues continue to persist, it might be prudent to schedule an appointment with a holistic or integrative practitioner to see if there is an underlying issue that needs to be addressed – such as an infection, parasites, SIBO, or another issue.

And just remember that if allowed to go on for a long time or get severe, constipation can become a medical emergency.  According to this article by Dr. Mercola – Constipation Emergencies are on the Rise,  “there was a 42 percent increase in ER visits for constipation in the US between 2006 and 2011.”  If chronic constipation goes on for a long time, it could leads to a blockage, also known as fecal impaction.  Or in rare very severe cases – constipation that has gone on too long – could lead to sepsis, a very dangerous infection.  So it is important to not allow a child to go more than a a few days without eliminating – you may need to use an enema or a glycerin suppository to prevent a blockage if a child has gone more than a couple days without having a BM, and is getting very uncomfortable, is not eating well, and is not able to produce a stool on his/her own.  If this is happening – please seek medical attention right away/have your child evalated by a gastroenterologist or pediatrician.

 

* Please note: the content in this article is for children ages 4 and up, and without any kidney disorder. This content is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided in this article is general and not specific to individuals. Persons experiencing problems or with questions about their health or medications, should consult their medical professional. Persons should carefully read the labels of all foods and supplements, and those who are taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before taking the above foods, herbs, vitamins or supplements to be sure there are no interactions.  Linked articles are provided for further resources and information and should not be construed as medical advice.

 

Resources/References:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/04/15/constipation-emergencies.aspx

http://www.poopdoc.com/problems-ignore-symptoms-constipation.htm

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/04/15/constipation-emergencies.aspx

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2013/10/immediate-relief/page-02

Drug for Adults Is Popular as Children’s Remedy – Previous title for this article was: “Miralax – a popular cure but never approved for children”

Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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“Skinny Starch” Raspberry Cream Tart (dairy, gluten & grain free)

February 15, 2017
Skinny Starch Raspberry Cream Tart

Have you heard of “skinny starch”?  It is also called “resistant starch” – because it resists digestion.  What that means is that it moves slowly through the digestive tract – so it helps to keep your blood sugar more stable, it is a prebiotic – meaning that it serves as “food” for the good bacteria in our colon. It is called the “skinny starch” because it can improve digestion, blood sugar, energy, and gut bacteria – all of which could potentially mean flatter bellies and weight loss.  But before you run out and eat a lot of skinny starch – realize that like any fiber – especially a prebiotic one – you want to begin to incorporate it slowly, or it could potentially cause digestive upset.

One of the best sources of resistant starch in my opinion comes from a small tuber called a tiger nut.  You can eat the nuts whole, or I like to add tiger nut flour to my daily smoothie.  Resistant starch can also help you sleep – so this Tiger Nut & Cashew Horchata drink is a nice thing to have before bedtime.  I also like to add tiger nut flour to desserts – like this raspberry tart!

"skinny starch" raspberry cream tart

 

“Sugar Cookie” Crust:

  • 1 cup of blanched almond flour
  • 1/2 cup of tiger nut flour (I like this one from Organic Gemini)
  • 1/2 cup shredded unsweetened coconut sugar cookie crust
  • 2 Tablespoons of virgin coconut oil (melted)
  • 3 dates (pits removed)
  • 3/4 teaspoon of organic stevia (I like this product called Pyure)
  • 3 Tablespoons of cashew butter (you could sub for almond butter)
  • 1/8 teaspoon of Real salt
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

CrustPut all the ingredients into a food processor, process until still crumbly, but starting to come together.

lightly grease a tart pan, and press the crust into it (I like to use my fingers to spread it around, then a flat bottom measuring cup to get it even. Press it so it comes up about halfway up the sides of the tart pan.

Put into freezer for about 20-30 mins.

 

Raspberry filling:

  • 1 can coconut milk (full fat)
  • 1 & 1/2 cups frozen organic raspberries
  • 2 teaspoons of organic steviaraspberry filling
  • 1/4 cup tiger nut flour
  • 1 scoop of vanilla protein powder (I like Warrior Blend)
  • pinch of Real salt

Put all of the above into the Vitamix, and blend until combined.

Take crust out of freezer, and pour filling onto the crust – spread with a spatula or spoon.  Return to freezer to set – at least 2 hours, up to a day ahead.  Remove from freezer before you want to serve, add the raspberries, and whipped cream if you like (see below).

Toppings:

  • Fresh raspberries

Coconut Whipped Cream (optional)

  • 1 can of full fat coconut milk (just cream) – store in refrigerator for at least 12 hours beforehand)raspberry tart with coconut cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon of stevia
  • 1/2 teaspoon of maple syrup
  • pinch of salt

Put the coconut milk in refrigerator the day before you want to make the cream.  Open the bottom of the can, and pour off the coconut water (reserve for smoothies, or another recipe).

Scoop out the coconut cream and put it into a bowl with the other ingredients, using a electric mixer – whip it up.  Taste and adjust.  Spoon onto slices before serving.

 

Want to learn more about Resistant Starch and get more delicious recipes – including “skinny starch” chocolate nut butter cups and cookie dough balls?  Take my Resistant Starch eCourse!

Enter code Fox5 to save 20% – expires February 28th!!

All About Resistant Starch

 

Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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Minty Fruit Salad

May 3, 2016
Minty Fruit Salad

Want to make a fruit salad that will stand out from the crowd?  This is it!  

The fresh mint and lime dressing really takes it to a whole other level.  Kind of out of this world.

Great for Mother’s Day Brunch or any other celebration – or maybe “just because!”

Get the kids involved – kids love making and eating this fruit salad too!

If you want to make the melon balls and kiwi shapes – you will need the following equipment:

Ingredients:

  • Minty fruit salad1 mini watermelon
  • 1 honeydew or cantaloupe
  • 1 pint of strawberries
  • 1 pint of raspberries or blueberries
  • 3-4 kiwi fruit
  • 3 limes
  • Mint – finely chopped (about 3 Tablespoons)
  • 2 or 3 teaspoons of raw honey (or your favorite natural alternative sweetener – like stevia or monk fruit)
  • Pinch of salt – to taste

You could add any other fruit you like to this – grapes, pineapple, etc.

Directions:

  1. Rinse the outside of the melons well (this helps to remove any potential bacteria)
  2. Slice the melons in half – and scoop out the flesh using the melon ball tool (or you can cut it into cube shapes if you don’t have a melon ball tool)
  3. Wash & dry all the berries.
  4. Slice the strawberries into bite sized pieces
  5. Cut the kiwi fruit into slices (about 4 centimeters thick).  Press the mini cookie cutter into the center – to create a kiwi shape!
  6. Put all the fruit into a bowl.
  7. Put into a glass measuring cup the juice from 2-3 limes, the honey, mint, and a pinch of salt.  Pour over fruit and stir to combine
  8. Serve & enjoy!

Or if you want to make this into a beautiful fruit skewer centerpiece – watch this video  (you don’t need the lime and mint syrup for this)

 

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Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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Chive & Zucchini Mini Baked Omelettes

May 3, 2016
Muffin Tin Omelettes

I love making these mini omelettes in  muffin tins – because they are easy and you always have leftovers.  These are easy enough to get the kids involved – so why not make a batch for Mom for Mother’s Day?  Bonus – because this makes quite a bit, there should be leftovers so mom won’t have to make breakfast on Monday either!! 

Ingredients:

  • 9 large organic free range eggs
  • 1 medium sized organic* zucchini, grated (diced asparagus or broccoli would work great too)  – approx. 3/4 cup
  • 3/4 cup of chopped baby spinach (about 3 handfuls before chopping)
  • chopped fresh chives – about 1 Tablespoon (add more if you like more!)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of high quality salt
  • 1/4 cup of water

Optional:

  • 1/2 cup of grated cheese
  • 1-2 slices of bacon or ham, chopped

Optional for serving:

  • Salsa (I like green salsa with this) or hot sauce
  • Avocado slices
  • Roasted new potatoes

Other good veggies to include in these:  onions (I sauté these first), chopped tomatoes, red peppers, or your favorite.

Eggs in muffin tinsDirections:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees

  1. Grease a 12 cup muffin tin with butter or avocado oil
  2. Grate the zucchini.
  3. Finely chop the chives and chop the spinach
  4. Crack the eggs into a large bowl, add the water, and lightly whip.
  5. Add in the salt, zucchini, spinach, chives, and any other ingredients you choose.
  6. Spoon evenly into muffin tins (should come up about 3/4 of the way – leave some room, as these will poof up).
  7. Bake for about 17 mins.
  8. Take out of the oven and serve!

 

  • I recommend using organic zucchini because zucchini can be GMO.

 

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Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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Green Chili Chicken

April 29, 2016
Green Chili Chicken

The secret ingredient in this chili is cauliflower – and you would never know it was there!!  A member of the cruciferous family, cauliflower adds fiber, vitamins, minerals, and also helps to give it some “body.”  Cauliflower is rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, and sulfur – which supports the liver.  But the real star of this dish is the tomatillos and poblano chili peppers – they are so delicious!!  My whole family loves this one pot dinner!  You could also make it in a slow cooker – but it would take longer.

Serves 6-8 people.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound – 1.5 pounds of chicken thighs or breasts (can be bone-in or not)
  • 1/2 of a medium sized cauliflower
  • 1 quart of free range chicken broth (can be homemade, I use low sodium if using boxed) 
  • 10-12 tomatillos
  • 3-4 poblano peppers
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • dried oregano – about 1 tsp.
  • Optional – Trader Joes 21 Spice Blend
  • 1 can of small white beans, drained (like great northern)omit if you want a “Paleo” meal
  • salt & pepper to taste

Optional Toppings:

  • Sour cream
  • Finely chopped jalapeno
  • Grated cheese

Directions:

Note: If you don’t have time for steps 1-5 and want a quicker and easier version – you could replace steps 1-5 with a jar of green tomatillo salsa – I like the Hatch chili kind at Trader Joes.

  1. Heat oven to about 400 degrees.
  2. Remove the papery skin from the tomatillos
  3. Coat tomatillos and poblanos in oil (I use avocado oil)
  4. Put on a sheet pan in pre-heated oven for about 30 minutes – turning with tongs about halfway through. They should be roasted and slightly charred.
  5. Put the poblanos in a bowl and cover with saran wrap or a lid for about 10 mins.  Then peel off the skins, and chop.
  6. Put the cauliflower into a food processor and pulse it until it is “riced.”
  7. Sprinkle the chicken with salt & pepper (and any other seasoning you like – I like to sprinkle it with Trader Joes 21 Spice Blend)
  8. Put a large heavy bottomed saucepan on the stove and warm up about 1-2  tablespoons of avocado oil (or coconut oil).
  9. When oil is heated, put in the chicken thighs or breasts and sauté over medium heat for about 5-7 minutes, to brown the outside – remove and put on a plate while you cook the onions.
  10. Add more oil if needed first – then put the onions in the pan and sauté over medium heat until translucent, about 3-5 mins.
  11. Add back the chicken, and the broth, the cauliflower “rice”, tomatillos, chopped poblanos, oregano, a teaspoon of salt, and any other seasonings you like (I sprinkle a little 21 Spice blend usually) – bring to a boil and then once boiling, drop down to a simmer.
  12. Simmer for about 30 minutes (stirring occasionally – and smashing the tomatillos on the side of the pot to break them up).
  13. Take the chicken out (check to see if it is done through) and let cool enough so you can shred it with a fork (remove bones and skin at this time – if you used skin on, bone in).
  14. Put the drained beans in (if using) and bring back to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook another 5 minutes.  If you have a hand blender – you can put it in for a few seconds – this will help to thicken it up, but is not absolutely needed.
  15. Add back the shredded chicken, simmer a few more minutes – taste and adjust salt and any seasonings.
  16. Put into bowls and serve with desired toppings.
  17. Save leftovers in fridge up to 3 days.

Recipe developed by Sara Vance. All rights reserved.

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Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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Buckwheat Crepes

January 6, 2016
Sara's Buckwheat Crepes

Can crepes change your life? These crepes are so easy, delicious, and versatile. So yes – I think these crepes just might! 

I can whip them up in a few minutes, and then I have some on hand to use as a wrap, they make a nice after school snack for the kids, and are great for breakfast, lunch, or dinner!

Commonly thought of as a grass/grain, buckwheat is actually a fruit seed which is related to rhubarb, and is gluten free.

The nutritional benefits of buckwheat include: manganese, magnesium, copper, B6, pantothenic acid, niacin, folate, thiamin, choline, D-chiro inositol, which can support healthy blood sugar, and bioflavinoids which supports healthy blood vessels.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup buckwheat flour
  • 2 eggs (organic, free range)
  • 1 cup milk (your choice – almond, coconut, raw cow or goats milk)
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 Tbs. butter (melted)

Directions:

  1. Mix together the wet ingredients and salt, then stir in the flour, and then add the melted butter.
  2. Warm up your crepe pan on medium-high heat.
  3. Then drop the pan temperature to just above medium, and using a 1/3 cup measuring cup – Screen Shot 2016-01-05 at 6.22.38 PMscoop up the batter and pour it into the pan. Immediately – start to swirl the batter around the pan to coat the pan and get the crepe to reach the edges and be as thin as possible.
  4. Cook on one side for about 2 minutes, or until golden brown.
  5. Flip over and cook another 2 minutes more (approx.)  If adding warm toppings, add them right after flipping the first side over. Fold over and serve!

 

Topping ideas:

  • Smoked salmon with goat cheese  herbs
  • Ham, cheese, spinach and mustard
  • Banana slices with almond butter or NuttZo.
  • Butter and cinnamon with a sprinkle of coconut sugar.
  • Spinach, thinly sliced zucchini, sauteed mushrooms and onions, and pesto sauce.
  • Chicken, sauteed spinach and a garlic sauce.

 

This recipe is one of the many recipes in The Metabolism Summit Cookbook – one of the free gifts you get when you purchase The Metabolism Summit package!!  Join me Feb 1-8th for this free event.  Register here!!

MET16_banner_attend_600x150

 

Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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Mini Meatloaves (Gluten & Grain free) w/ Homemade Ketchup

May 26, 2015
Mini Meatloaves

 AKA “Meat muffins”

I love it when I come up with a recipe that is healthy, and passes the kid taste test – this recipe hit it out of the ballpark on both accounts!  Even my quinoa-hating daughter loved them – I only told her about the quinoa after she had decided that she loved them!  My kids like to call them “meat muffins” because they are made in muffin tins – which makes them even more fun!

I have already made this recipe twice, and my kids regularly ask for it – so I plan to make it again this week.  The leftovers make a great (hearty) after school snack, or a quick meal – but in my house, they don’t last for long!

Yield: 12 individual meat loaves.

Ingredients:

  • 1 and 3/4 pounds (approx.) ground grass fed beef*
  • 1 onion, very finely chopped (or grated)
  • 1 medium zucchini (organic)*, finely grated (yields about 3/4 cup finely grated)
  • 2 eggs*
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 stalks of celery, very finely diced
  • 3/4 cup of cooked quinoa
  • 2 tsp of gluten free Worcestershire sauce (this is optional)
  • 1/2 tsp. of dijon mustard
  • 1 and 1/2 tsp. Himalayan salt
  • cracked pepper to taste
  • 1 tsp of dried thyme
  • 3-4 Tablespoons of fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon of tomato paste
  • 2 Tablespoons of avocado oil (for sautéing the onions), plus more for greasing the muffin tin

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 9.05.47 AM

Sauce (Ketchup):

  • 1/2 cup of tomato paste
  • 5 tsp. of apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp. of dijon mustard (or more if you like)
  • 1/2  tsp. Himalayan salt
  • pinch of ground cloves, pinch of garlic powder
  • 1 tsp. of coconut palm sugar (or a few drops of stevia for a sugar free option – or honey, raw agave, or another natural sweetener.)  I found this to be the perfect sweetness, but add another teaspoon if you prefer.

Put the sugar into the vinegar and stir until it dissolves. Then add all the ingredients together, stir to combine – taste & adjust.  Store in refrigerator until ready to use.  This step can be done a day or two ahead.

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Coat a muffin tin with avocado oil
  3. Cook the quinoa & let cool (this can be done a day ahead – just make sure to make enough to yield 3/4 cup cooked – I always make a little extra to save in the refrigerator to throw into a salad).
  4. Grate the zucchini (using fine grater) and squeeze out all the excess moisture with a couple of paper towels (I squeezed it over the sink).
  5. Finely chop the onion, mince the garlic, and very finely chop the celery and parsley.
  6. Heat a pan on medium, add in 2 Tablespoons of avocado oil (or coconut oil). Add the onions and sauté for about 5-6 minutes, or until soft & translucent.  Add in the garlic and celery and cook about 2-3 mins more.  Take onion mixture off heat, and let cool.
  7. Crack the eggs into a bowl, whisk them to break up yolks, and then add in all the other ingredients except beef (and the avocado oil, which is for sautéing).  Mix to combine.  Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 9.05.38 AM
  8. And finally – add in the grass fed beef – gently combining. (I find that it works best when I mix the beef in by hand).
  9. Scoop the meatloaf mixture into oiled muffin tins.Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 9.05.26 AM
  10. Put into the pre-heated 375 degree oven and cook for 20 minutes. (I like to put a sheet pan underneath in case of any drippings).
  11. Raise oven temperature to 425 degrees.  Take muffin tin out of oven, spread a teaspoon of sauce on top of each meatloaf, return to 425 degree oven and cook another 10 minutes.
  12. Take out of oven, let rest 5 minutes, and then serve with additional sauce on the side.

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 9.04.57 AM

This recipe is great with steamed broccoli with some grass fed butter and mashed potatoes.   Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to 3 days (they won’t last that long)!

*A note about quality – I always make sure to go for grass fed beef – to avoid hormones, antibiotics, and other additives – plus grass fed beef is higher in omega 3s and 500% higher in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) than conventional beef – which studies have found helps to burn fat (read this article to learn more).  I also always choose organic for zucchini – because conventional zucchini is highly likely to be GMO, which I avoid because there is evidence that GMOs could be harming our gut health and even increase our risk of cancer.  And finally – I always look for organic pastured or free range eggs – which also have a higher amount of omega 3s and no antibiotics or hormones.

 

 

 

 

Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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Are We Overwhelming Our Kids’ with Sugar & Processed Foods?

January 24, 2015
222
Categories: ADHD, Kids, Nutrition, Sugar

Thank you to Coronado SAFE for inviting me to speak at your 3rd Annual Parenting Conference!

Recently someone whose child has been dealing with a bunch of health issues asked me “Why does kids’ health have to be so complicated nowadays?”  He has a point:

  • 1 in 10 kids currently has fatty liver disease (40% of obese kids).
  • Adult onset diabetes is now called Type 2 Diabetes, because it is increasingly affecting kids.
  • 1 out of every 2 Latina or African American girls is expected to develop diabetes in their lifetime.
  • 1 in every 3 kids has one of the 4 “A”s (asthma, autism, allergies, ADHD).
  • Thirty percent of kids today are overweight or obese.
  • We are seeing more autoimmunity, metabolic issues, skin conditions, digestion issues, hormone imbalances, anxiety, depression and other health issues in today’s youth.

The statistics are so grim that  experts worry that in a few decades there may not be enough healthy individuals to take care of the sick individuals.  In fact, this may be the first generation of kids which may not outlive their parents.

I think the question we all have to ask is –  What’s food got to do with it? 

Take a walk down the aisle of your average grocery store, and you will see hundreds and thousands of brightly colored and flavor-blasted sodas, chips, cookies, cereals, bars, yogurts, candies, energy and sports drinks, mac n cheese cups, frozen pizzas and dinners, refrigerator doughs, ice creams, and a wide variety of foods specifically designed and marketed towards….our kids.

Seventy four percent of these foods contain added sugars.  And far too many of these foods contain artificial colors, flavorings, flavor enhancers, preservatives, monosodium glutamate, trans fats, GMOs, and other ingredients that we don’t recognize or know what they are there for.

The question remains – is this even food?  Or is it a science experiment?  And do we want our kids to be lab rats in a giant experiment?

I know all too well how tempting all this junk food can be for a kid.

 

Sara eating ice cream, age 12Can you guess who that girl is in this photo?

Yep – that was me. I think I was around 12 years old then. Some of my favorite foods were hot dogs and ice cream.

If you had told that girl that she would one day write a book, speak in front of large audiences, and go on TV regularly – all to share her knowledge about nutrition and health – she would have laughed herself silly. You see, when I was that age, I didn’t realize that what I ate affected everything – from my energy, to my moods, brain function, digestion, immune system, and my weight.  All I cared about was how food tasted.  And I frequently reached for things like hot dogs, candy, sodas, cookies, cakes, and chips.

Sure, they might taste good – but in the long term all that junk food can cause tremendous mental and physical pain.

But I am one of the lucky ones – because the majority of overweight children grow up to become overweight/obese adults.

The thing is – it doesn’t have to be this way.

NO ONE HAS TO BE A STATISTIC.

I am living proof.

So what can we do to stop this trajectory?  The answer is surprisingly simple:

Eat Real Food. 

Although it may be simple, it might not be so easy.

Because if you are eating packaged and processed foods, you are getting a lot more sugar, chemicals and GMOs in your diet than you realize.

Here are 5 Tips to Help you Improve Your Family’s Diet: 

1. Cut way back on added sugar – read Are Our Kids Eating Toxic Amounts of Sugar? for more info.

2. Avoid anything with partially hydrogenated oils (this means there are trans fats).

3. Get the artificial colors out.  If it has a color and a number after it, it is an artificial color.  Artificial colors have been found to affect attention and behavior in some kids.  In fact, in the United Kingdom – if a food has an artificial color, it has to have a label on it that says:

‘may have an adverse effect on activity and attention in children’

So instead of putting on that label, most manufacturers will use natural colorings instead.  For example, if you buy Kraft mac n cheese in the UK, it is made with natural colorings, while the blue box in the US contains artificial colors.  There are many other examples of this kind of double standard.

4. Avoid chemicals in foods like mono-sodium glutamate (MSG), flavor enhancers, and preservatives.    If you can’t pronounce it, or don’t know what it is – it probably is a chemical.

5. Eat more plant-based foods – especially vegetables.  Studies show that eating more plant-based foods can lower your risk of disease and prolong your life.  Shoot for between 7 and 9 servings of plant based foods every day.  Or try to fill up half your plate at least twice daily.

 

Want to learn more about nutrition and health?

Below are some additional resources:

Videos/Ted Talks:

Websites:

Apps:

Documentaries:

Other:

Books:

Articles:

Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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Zucchini Pizza Crust

January 6, 2015
zucchini-crust

This crust is gluten free and delicious – and easy to make!

Ingredients:

  • 2 small organic zucchini (or one and a half large ones), grated
  • 2 organic eggs
  • 2 tsp. chia seeds (I like to use ground ones for this, but either works)
  • 1/2 cup garbanzo bean flour (chickpea)
  • 1 TBS. Coconut oil (melted) – you will need a little more for the pizza stone
  • 1 tsp. good quality salt
  • pepper to taste
  • 1 garlic clove – pressed, or 1/2 tsp of garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried Italian herbs – such as basil, oregano

Directions to Make the Pizza Dough:

  1. Put your pizza stone or pan into the oven and preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Crack eggs into bowl, and whisk them. Add in the chia seeds, let soak for a few mins.
  3. Now grate the zucchini.
  4. Add the zucchini and the rest of the ingredients in with the eggs, and stir to combine.
  5. Take pre-heated pizza stone out of the oven.  Coat area with coconut oil.  Spoon the dough evenly onto the stone. You can make 3 small individual pizza crusts, or one large one.
  6. Put the pizza stone into the lower third of the oven to bake for about 8 minutes.
  7. Move it up to the bottom of the upper third of the oven (not too close to the top). Cook for another 5-8 mins.
  8. It should be fairly firm and cooked through. If you put a spatula under it, it should not be soggy or bend too much.
  9. Now it is ready to add your toppings.
  10. Preheat the pizza stone in a 425 degree oven.  Add your toppings to the crusts and place them on the pre-heated stone and return it to the oven, bake until toppings melt, about 8-10 minutes.

Suggested toppings: carmelized onions, arugula, tomatoes, sauteed mushrooms, thinly sliced red peppers, slices green or black olives, and shredded goat or sheeps milk cheese.

Sara Vance Article written by Nutritionist Sara Vance, author of the book
The Perfect Metabolism Plan A regular guest on Fox 5 San Diego, you can see many of Sara’s segments on her media page. She also offers corporate nutrition, school programs, consultations, and affordable online eCourses. Download her free 40+ page Metabolism Jumpstart eBook here.

*This article is for educational purposes only. The content contained in this article is not to be construed as providing medical advice. All information provided is general and not specific to individuals. Persons with questions about the above content as how it relates to them, should contact their medical professional. Persons already taking prescription medications should consult a doctor before making any changes to their supplements or medications.

©2015, all rights reserved. Sara Vance.

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